Dream Homes

Moor Street Townhouses by Milieu Property

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Milieu Property created five luxury townhouses located in Fitzroy, Melbourne. The project features an environmentally sustainable design with warm, monochromatic palettes, open-plan design and a white-washed oak timber flooring.

Elegant and industrial, the townhouses mirror the dynamic cultural precinct. The brief was to create a private and secure oasis, while mirroring the the contrasts of the surroundings. The townhouses are rough yet refined, elegant yet urban. The design features a cement rendered finish and metal roof on the exterior, while an abundance of natural light is prevalent throughout the building. A distinctive bluestone also features extensively throughout the properties, drawing inspiration from the post-modern industrial structures and cobblestone lanes of Melbourne.

For more information go to www.milieuproperty.com.au






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 24 October, 2014

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Calvin Street Home by Chris Dyson Architects

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Chris Dyson Architects converted a run down Victorian warehouse located in Londra, United Kingdom, into three large luxury units. This project successfully converted a run down Victorian warehouse in Shoreditch into three large, luxury units with a rooftop level copper clad extension. The character of the original warehouse is celebrated at every opportunity and emphasis is placed on using new materials that are complimentary to the character of the existing building.

The building was substantially thermally upgraded using an insulated external render to the exposed party wall which allowed the existing brick internal walls to be exposed and enjoyed. Historic Critall factory windows were refurbished and reinstated and a discreet copper clad box at roof level has large terraces to the north and south.

Photography by Peter Landers






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 21 October, 2014

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Sawyer Residence in California by Rachlin Partners

Beautiful 1950’s California residence completely redesigned by Rachlin Partners, located in Los Angeles, United States.

Transformation of the Sawyer House began with gutting the entire interior of the 2,000-square-foot structure in two phases over a twenty-year period. A typical 1950’s California residence, the house lacked a definable style and was in poor condition due in part to damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Outdated avocado-colored kitchen appliances finalized the decision to modify this quintessential California house. Only the foundation, exterior bearing walls and roof structure were retained.

The Sawyer House has a magnificent park-like setting on a quiet cul-de-sac adjacent to a golf course, on a heavily wooded site. Although close to an urban environment, the house offers a sense of seclusion and space beyond the confines of its site. Both exterior and interior spaces have been organized to take full advantage of sweeping panoramic views and the extraordinary sense of space. Exterior areas include a front patio, side deck with fire pit, pool and spa and a raised deck/exterior lounge area.

Michael Rachlin’s approach to redesign of the structure blurs the line between traditional and modern, reinterpreting the archetypal vernacular using a minimalist language. Due to its relative small footprint, the house appears to be a modern-day cottage delineated by the geometric forms of hipped or gabled roofs with a series of cupolas added to the mix for visual interest.

At the south-facing front of the house, two freestanding peaked clapboard walls create the major formal gesture. The smaller wall defines a new entrance, while the larger wall delineates a semi-private front patio, which acts as an extension of the entrance hall and living room. Playing off the lines of the existing gabled roof, the architects created additional gable and hipped roof structures, as well as peaked interior spaces—establishing a motif for the entire the house. Both the living room and the master suite are airy, high-volume spaces filled with light and a feeling of calm, due in part to the skylight that runs the length of the upstairs ridge. (via)






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 16 October, 2014

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A Stunning Interior by Christopher Elliott Design

Stunning single storey residence recently redesigned by Christopher Elliott Design. It’s situated in Templestowe, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia.

“We are all familiar with the wise saying “a stitch in time saves nine”, but this proverb does not best describe the approach taken by the previous owners of this expansive single storey house, towards the maintenance of their property. In fact the house and its gorgeous surrounding gardens; although ideally located amongst the rolling hills of Templestowe, were a veil to the outdated rooms and darkened interior that lay within.

So by the time the current owners had purchased it they were rather overwhelmed as to how they would transform this awkward 1970’s property into a stunning home. Fear not, they called in the expert eye of Christopher Elliott; who had recently completed the design of their friend’s house.

From the onset, it was clear to Christopher a complete overhaul of the disjointed internal architecture was in order; for the existing layout didn’t take full advantage of the picturesque garden outlook and left many rooms unutilised. Christopher’s new floor plan design brought unity to the architecture and enabled a more intuitive relationship between each of the various rooms of the house. Pivotal to the new design was the decision to open large sections of the house onto the pre-existing centrally located pool and courtyard via large expansive sliding doors, installed throughout the living spaces and the master bedroom. These modifications provided the house with a beautiful tranquil vista and some much-needed natural light; it was also the inspiration for the new colour scheme. Christopher’s new design also incorporated all of the necessary state-of-art modern conveniences and luxuries expected from a house of this calibre, which in some instances required striping the house back to its bare bones. The extensive renovation would also provide a clean backdrop for a new tailor made interior design, better suited to the client’s lifestyle.

The first phase of the project involved altering the access into the master bedroom via a newly appointed ‘parents retreat’ which was previously an unused storage space and blocking off the old entrance from the kids study area. Thus providing more privacy and separation for the clients from their two growing teenage boys, now who wouldn’t want that? Also, the remodelling of the master bedroom incorporated a spare bedroom that was transformed into a beautiful, generous walk in robe and the previous inadequately sized walk in robe and ensuite became one large ensuite with a separate toilet. As you can guess, this house was not short of space!

The second phase of the project included the complete demolition and reinstatement of the properties kitchen, study, spare bedroom, both formal and casual living/dining spaces. The massive renovation was a bold direction but took all of the previously unused areas, and there were many, transforming and simplifying them into functional, practical and enjoyable spaces with the kitchen at the heart of the design. And what a big heart it is! The kitchen island bench alone is an impressive seven metres long, clad in a stunning ‘Super White’ marble and with a butler’s pantry come laundry extending off from the kitchen that can be completely concealed with the closing of the full height sliding door. The new design meant many of the existing internals walls were removed and subsequently new engineered support beams were required to underpin the large ‘A’ frame roof, but these were cleverly concealed behind feature timber posts. That was also aesthetically a way of partitioning adjoining spaces without totally blocking either the light or the view.

The third and final phase of the project was the most rewarding for the clients, for it is when they could finally begin to truly experience the wonderful results of Christopher’s thoughtful and meticulous design. Many of the previous decisions and choices lay the foundations of the design, but it was not until the final selection of the furniture, decoration and artwork were in place, could they fully appreciate the vision Christopher had all along. Most of the furniture and artwork for this project were made-to-order and in some instances Christopher specifically designed pieces of furniture to suit. This process also included the commissioning of several artists’ works. One significant piece that hangs above a colourful custom-made sideboard in the dining space was a beautiful work by renowned Australian artist Andrew O’Brien. This dynamic artwork, visible from the front entrance, sets the tone for the entire house, one that is bold, brave and surprising”.

Photography by Sharyn Cairns






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 9 October, 2014

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MINIMALIST BLAIRGOWRIE RESIDENCE UNCOVERS OCEAN VIEWS BY FGR ARCHITECTS

‘Blairgowrie Residence’ has been created by modernist design practice FGR Architects, and showcases breath-taking views that cascade onto the ocean and scenic panoramic views from every room.

A minimalist design inspired by Mediterranean dwellings and single palette homes with views that cascade onto the ocean, Blairgowrie Residence by FGR Architects showcases stunning bay views, spectacular panoramas, large open spaces for entertaining and sprawling verdant landscaping.
Situated on the bay in Melbourne’s popular coastal town of Blairgowrie, the house is a minimalist juxtaposition of white and grey tones seeped in natural light. Designed to be a sanctuary, the dwelling comprises five bedrooms, three ensuites, two bathrooms, as well as two powder rooms, comfortably accommodating guests as well as its residents.

Quiet hidden spaces, expansive entertainment areas and access to bay views from every room were essential to the design brief. Director of FGR Architects, Feras Raffoul, explains the design challenge of augmenting the serenity of the natural environment whilst ensuring privacy and light throughout the home.
“Some of the special design considerations were to achieve bay-views from all living and sleeping rooms on the first floor while keeping the privacy for the home occupants. This was challenging with a corner block on a busy road. I think we achieved it.”
With a large open plan living, kitchen and dining area that opens onto the indoor/outdoor-entertaining balcony, and a ground level family room with a bar stretching to the infinity pool, BBQ and outdoor cinema, Blairgowrie Residence is the result of modernist FGR Architects’ vision to bring light and horizon into each room to create the perfect sanctuary for a family home.

Through selecting a single material palette of a cement-based render, commonly known as a concrete patch, the minimalist design of the residence with its modern, sleek lines sits timelessly on its own, without overshadowing the natural environment.
“This was a design approach of removing building form. A large square or rectangular built form provides design challenges to achieve maximum natural light to the core. By indenting the central part, it minimizes the distance light is required to travel from the glass facade into the floor area,” he said.
“We wanted to ensure that we had natural light penetrating into all sections of the home. We achieved this by indenting the central part of the building, allowing light to penetrate into the middle.”






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 1 October, 2014

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Contemporary Interior by i29 Architects

i29 Architects have designed this cool interior  for an apartment in Amsterdam.
This single-family apartment for four people is situated in a stately building in southern Amsterdam, NL. The original structure, with rooms for staff, a double hall and long hallways with lots of doors has been transformed into a spacious, transparent dwelling full of light and air.

A kitchen in combination with cabinets from floor to ceiling has laser-cut front panels, all spray painted white. This pattern results in a dynamic mixture of open and closed cabinets, the holes also function as integrated handgrips. The transparency of the object’s skin gives depth to the volume which is complimented by furniture like the Grcic chair one. An atrium with open staircases brings natural light from a large roof light into the living area. Along the open staircase a wall of two stories high is covered with clear pine wood, and connects the two levels. Upstairs the master bedroom is situated next to a large bathroom with a finish of structured tiles from Patricia Urquola, glass, and wooden cabinets.






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 22 September, 2014

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Beautiful Modern House by ONG & ONG

ONG&ONG  have completed the renovation of an early 1900′s shophouse into a contemporary family home in Singapore.

The 17BR-House is a Peranakan shophouse originally built between 1900 and 1940. The homeowners wanted to build a warm family home that would preserve the shophouse’s historical character and reverse the drastic alterations done during its previous incarnation as an office space.

In reinstating 17BR-House as a residence, an inner courtyard was created on the first floor, allowing sunlight and air to flow freely into and throughout the house. The installation of a green wall as well as the covering of the floor entirely in carpet grass transforms the courtyard into a quaint indoor garden. This space forms the visual focus for the first floor; with the absence of partition walls, there is a seamless visual transition from the kitchen at the back of the building to the living area at the front, allowing the family-oriented homeowner to interact with his children while indulging in culinary exploits in the kitchen.

A dramatic spiral staircase spanning all three levels maximises vertical circulation while skylights in the jack roof directly above the staircase provide natural illumination. Timber beams installed in the ceiling of the first floor and the roof adds an old world charm to the home.

The second floor holds two bedrooms; both share a bathroom, a long corridor lined with bookshelves and storage space, as well as equally enjoyable views, one of the traditional façade and the other of the green wall in the courtyard.

The top floor houses the master bedroom and a separate bathroom visually connected to the bedroom via a long slab of limestone that serves as the top counter of the bathroom’s vanity and continues onward into the corridor, forming a functional desk area amidst a bookshelf-lined wall. The skylight in the master bathroom illuminates both the bathroom and the balcony on the second floor with natural daylight.

The shophouse’s rear comprises a kitchen, the service quarters as well as a 7-metre long swimming pool, with traditional glazed floor tiles and a replica spiral staircase at the back reminiscent of the shophouse’s early days.

The façade’s restoration, with the reversion to a single pintu pagar door, the reinstatement of the traditional, taller windows on the second floor, and the use of shiny enamel-finished dado tiles, completes the project that goes beyond the creation of a perfect, modern family home to a preservation of an invaluable cultural heritage.

The shophouse had been in a bad state, having been stripped of its historical characteristics and renovated for office use. With much support from the client, the architects made a conscious effort to bring these traditional elements back while also reinstating the shophouse to residential use. Considering the scale of the restorative work required the final product is both a perfect home for the modern family as well as a fitting tribute to the shophouse’s history. (via)

 






Posted by Michelle Lesser at 17 September, 2014

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