Extravaganza : Emeco Navy Chair

The Navy Chair (1944), first built for use on submarines and has been in continuous production ever since.  Emeco’s 77-step patented construction process was invented to satisfy a military need for lightweight, corrosion-resistant equipment. In the late 1990s, the Navy Chair’s iconic design began catching the attention of architects and designers, initiating a new era for Emeco. Beginning with soft, recycled aluminum, 1006 Navy seating goes through a series of hand-crafted processes, including heat treatment and anodizing, to render the chair diamond-hard and virtually indestructible. Though imitations of the 1006 exist far and wide, Emeco’s Navy Chair is the only one to go through this rigorous production process. Three small welds on the back of the slats are left exposed to indicate that this often-copied seating is the real thing. Specially made stainless steel foot caps are covered with a clear plastic glide to prevent scratching floors or snagging carpets.

 

Extravaganza : Shell Chair by Hans J. Wegner


Danish designer Hans J. Wegner preferred to work in solid wood, but occasionally he explored the use of bent plywood, and for that we are very thankful. Sometimes called the “smiling chair,” his Shell Chair (1963) achieves a floating lightness due to its wing-like seat and the arching curves of its tapered legs. And while it stands on only three legs, this chair has an absolute stability that could only be achieved by someone with Wegner’s expertise in cabinetmaking and architecture. Wegner’s belief that a chair “should be beautiful from all sides and angles” is especially evident with his Shell Chair. This comfortable masterpiece is a marvel of grace and beauty.

80th Anniversary of the Artek Stool 60

The 1930s marked a breakthrough for Alvar Aalto both as an architect and a designer. The simple, stackable and durable wooden stool represented a new approach to furniture design, and a continuation of the brand of modernism initiated by Bauhaus. The stool represents a durable and modern technical solution that later on led to the creation of many other classic designs.

Extravaganza : Paulistano Armchair by Paulo Mendes da Rocha

The Paulistano Armchair, the work of Brazilian designer Paulo Mendes da Rocha, is a 1957 classic piece of funriture. This chair was originally designed for the Paulistano Athletic Club in São Paulo, Brazil. The frame, a continuous 17-foot-long piece of solid steel, is welded in a single spot. This deceptively simple structure is then wrapped in almost an entire hide of leather that will gain depth and luster as it ages. Exceptionally comfortable, the Paulistano flexes slightly, and the sling can be adjusted up or down the frame for upright or relaxed sitting positions. The stainless steel frame is hand-machine polished and may exhibit markings consistent with hand craftsmanship. The frame in phosphatized carbon steel, which is the original raw material used in 1957, is slightly rough to the touch and will oxidize slowly with time. This was the intent of the architect, who wants the appearance to evolve, believing the charm of a piece of furniture resides in its non-permanent character.

Extravaganza : Le Corbusier LC4 Chaise

The Le Corbusier LC4 Lounge Chair is the best known and most successful of Le Corbusier’s original designs of the 1920s. The Le Corbusier LC4 chaise is a testament to modern relaxation. The curves closely mirror the body’s natural curves, while hovering over the solid, stable supports.